The Real Cost of Using Domestic Equipment

Many businesses, from care homes to restaurants, use domestic equipment to handle their needs, thinking that they will save money on the machines that could be used for other purposes. This is actually a false economy; using domestic laundry and catering equipment can raise issues around efficiency, performance regulatory compliance and even budgets.

In a best-case scenario, using a domestic machine in a commercial setting will simply cause delays and make it harder for you to run a laundry room or a kitchen. Lloyds Hair in Co Waterford found that out the hard way as their towel laundry piled up. Equipment will break down more frequently as it won’t be able to cope with constant commercial use – and the warranties on domestic models are often voided by use in a commercial setting.

In a worst-case scenario, you could run afoul of regulatory standards and be subject to warnings, fines or prosecution. For example, a care home using a domestic washing machine that lacks a sluice cycle, a thermal disinfection cycle and the highest level of backflow protection could face a poor inspection rating from CQC as well as enforcement action by their local water undertaker. A restaurant using a domestic refrigerator will run afoul of HACCP reporting as they won’t be able to accurately record temperatures.

“We’re constantly meeting with business owners who didn’t know that they were required to use commercial equipment, either due to regulations or because the warranty on a domestic machine is often voided if it’s used commercially,” says Chief Marketing Officer Liam Grant. “Our consultants and engineers have to give them a bit of a wake-up call and really talk to them about compliance, as well as the long-term benefits of buying commercial over domestic.”

Simply put, that domestic oven or washing machine might look like a real bargain for your business, but the long-term hassle and stress that will come with that purchase just isn’t worth it.